Discussion:
Solar Parabolic Trough Solution
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Jon G.
2017-01-31 10:41:21 UTC
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The idea is to make a Parabolic Trough with a pipe through the length of its
focus, to have sunlight heat liquid in the pipe.

http://stonetaberacle3.yolasite.com

In this particular development I wanted to be able to fully utilize the 48
inch width of a roll of reflective mylar to surface the trough. I
calculated the arc length of a 2-D slice of the parabola using Calculus. I
used the nested parabolas solution
http://www.stonetabernacle.com/NESTED_PARABOLAS3.html to account for 1/4
inch plywood to create the parabolic trough surface. I chose the focus of
the parabola at (0., 5 inches).

The resulting equation was complex, so I drew a graph of it and
qualitatively deduced where the curve intersected the abscissa, which was
the solution to the width at the top of the parabola, which resulted in 34
3/4 inches, well within the use of a 4' x 8' sheet of 3/4 inch thick plywood
to make the frame.

While there are infinite combinations that will work to construct a Solar
Parabolic Trough, I chose this one for depth, range and the availability of
materials. A flatter parabola doesn't have to be adjusted as much to face
the sun but suffers from lesser heat. A deeper parabola has to follow the
sun more closely but produces more concentrated heat.

There may be infinite combinations, but the equation remains the same for
all of them.

Jon G.
***@bellaire.tv


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Jon G.
2017-01-31 19:57:02 UTC
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Post by Jon G.
The idea is to make a Parabolic Trough with a pipe through the length of
its focus, to have sunlight heat liquid in the pipe.
http://stonetaberacle3.yolasite.com
In this particular development I wanted to be able to fully utilize the 48
inch width of a roll of reflective mylar to surface the trough. I
calculated the arc length of a 2-D slice of the parabola using Calculus.
I used the nested parabolas solution
http://www.stonetabernacle.com/NESTED_PARABOLAS3.html to account for 1/4
inch plywood to create the parabolic trough surface. I chose the focus of
the parabola at (0., 5 inches).
The resulting equation was complex, so I drew a graph of it and
qualitatively deduced where the curve intersected the abscissa, which was
the solution to the width at the top of the parabola, which resulted in 34
3/4 inches, well within the use of a 4' x 8' sheet of 3/4 inch thick
plywood to make the frame.
While there are infinite combinations that will work to construct a Solar
Parabolic Trough, I chose this one for depth, range and the availability
of materials. A flatter parabola doesn't have to be adjusted as much to
face the sun but suffers from lesser heat. A deeper parabola has to
follow the sun more closely but produces more concentrated heat.
There may be infinite combinations, but the equation remains the same for
all of them.
Jon G.
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http://www.stonetabernacle.com/Parabolic_Trough.html


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Yuri Kretin
2017-02-01 00:52:01 UTC
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Post by Jon G.
The idea is to make a Parabolic Trough with a pipe through the length of
its focus, to have sunlight heat liquid in the pipe.
http://stonetaberacle3.yolasite.com
In this particular development I wanted to be able to fully utilize the
48 inch width of a roll of reflective mylar to surface the trough. I
calculated the arc length of a 2-D slice of the parabola using
Calculus. I used the nested parabolas solution
http://www.stonetabernacle.com/NESTED_PARABOLAS3.html to account for
1/4 inch plywood to create the parabolic trough surface. I chose the
focus of the parabola at (0., 5 inches).
The resulting equation was complex, so I drew a graph of it and
qualitatively deduced where the curve intersected the abscissa, which
was the solution to the width at the top of the parabola, which resulted
in 34 3/4 inches, well within the use of a 4' x 8' sheet of 3/4 inch
thick plywood to make the frame.
While there are infinite combinations that will work to construct a
Solar Parabolic Trough, I chose this one for depth, range and the
availability of materials. A flatter parabola doesn't have to be
adjusted as much to face the sun but suffers from lesser heat. A deeper
parabola has to follow the sun more closely but produces more
concentrated heat.
There may be infinite combinations, but the equation remains the same
for all of them.
Jon G.
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good work.
I suggest looking at "Non-Imaging Optics" they show designs that are
close to parobolic but not, they dont have to track the sun exactly,
they have wider area of focus on a tube and the sun can move about 20
degrees before having to pulse it back over. I think the curve is a
Quartic, close to the parabola, but different. It is a Hot area of
research.
William Elliot
2017-02-01 13:01:09 UTC
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Post by Jon G.
The idea is to make a Parabolic Trough with a pipe through the length
of its focus, to have sunlight heat liquid in the pipe.
http://stonetaberacle3.yolasite.com
In this particular development I wanted to be able to fully utilize
the 48 inch width of a roll of reflective mylar to surface the trough.
I calculated the arc length of a 2-D slice of the parabola using
Calculus. I used the nested parabolas solution
http://www.stonetabernacle.com/NESTED_PARABOLAS3.html to account for
1/4 inch plywood to create the parabolic trough surface. I chose the
focus of the parabola at (0., 5 inches).
The resulting equation was complex, so I drew a graph of it and
qualitatively deduced where the curve intersected the abscissa, which
was the solution to the width at the top of the parabola, which
resulted in 34 3/4 inches, well within the use of a 4' x 8' sheet of
3/4 inch thick plywood to make the frame.
While there are infinite combinations that will work to construct a
Solar Parabolic Trough, I chose this one for depth, range and the
availability of materials. A flatter parabola doesn't have to be
adjusted as much to face the sun but suffers from lesser heat. A
deeper parabola has to follow the sun more closely but produces more
concentrated heat.
For best results, track the sun continuously.
Is not such equipment available from amateur astronomy outlets?
Yuri Kretin
2017-02-01 21:39:35 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by William Elliot
Post by Jon G.
The idea is to make a Parabolic Trough with a pipe through the length
of its focus, to have sunlight heat liquid in the pipe.
http://stonetaberacle3.yolasite.com
In this particular development I wanted to be able to fully utilize
the 48 inch width of a roll of reflective mylar to surface the trough.
I calculated the arc length of a 2-D slice of the parabola using
Calculus. I used the nested parabolas solution
http://www.stonetabernacle.com/NESTED_PARABOLAS3.html to account for
1/4 inch plywood to create the parabolic trough surface. I chose the
focus of the parabola at (0., 5 inches).
The resulting equation was complex, so I drew a graph of it and
qualitatively deduced where the curve intersected the abscissa, which
was the solution to the width at the top of the parabola, which
resulted in 34 3/4 inches, well within the use of a 4' x 8' sheet of
3/4 inch thick plywood to make the frame.
While there are infinite combinations that will work to construct a
Solar Parabolic Trough, I chose this one for depth, range and the
availability of materials. A flatter parabola doesn't have to be
adjusted as much to face the sun but suffers from lesser heat. A
deeper parabola has to follow the sun more closely but produces more
concentrated heat.
For best results, track the sun continuously.
Is not such equipment available from amateur astronomy outlets?
there is a nice solar powered gas tube piston that works nice (no
electricity needed) , they are on a system here build 20 years ago.
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